The first African American to receive the Medal of Honor in  the Civil War. Despite the fact that he had been shot many times he would not let the American Flag touch the ground. A true American, what would he say if he was still alive?

Biography

William Harvey Carney was born as a slave in Norfolk, Virginia, on February 29, 1840.  How he made his way to freedom is not certain. According to most accounts, he escaped through the Underground Railroad, and joined his father in Massachusetts. Other members of their family were freed by purchase or by the death of their master.

Civil War

Carney joined the 54th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry in March 1863 as a sergeant. He took part in the July 18, 1863, assault on Fort Wagner in Charleston, South Carolina. His actions there ultimately earned him the Medal of Honor. When the color guard was killed, Carney retrieved the U.S. flag and marched forward with it, despite serious wounds. When the Union troops were forced to retreat under fire, he struggled back across the battlefield, eventually returning to his own lines and turning over the colors to another survivor of the 54th, saying, “Boys, I only did my duty; the old flag never touched the ground!”  He received an honorable discharge due to disability from his wounds in June 1864.

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