Health, Home & Family

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By Blanca Taylor

Social Security Public Affairs Specialist 

In 2018, more than a million people will be diagnosed with cancer around the world. This alarming statistic affects people and families everywhere. On June 3, 2018, we observe National Cancer Survivors Day in the United States. In support of this day, Social Security encourages getting checkups to provide early detection, raise awareness through education, and recognize the survivors who have gone through this battle or are still living with the disease.

Social Security supports people who are fighting cancer. We offer support to patients dealing with this disease through our disability program. People with certain cancers may be eligible for a Compassionate Allowance. Compassionate Allowances are cases where individuals have medical conditions so severe they obviously meet Social Security’s disability standards, allowing us to process the cases quickly with minimal medical information. Continue reading

Social Security Helps You Care for Seniors

By Blanca Taylor

Social Security Public Affairs Specialist

World Elder Abuse Awareness Day is June 15. This is an opportunity for everyone, all over the world, to voice their opposition to abuses inflicted on some of the most vulnerable members of our society. For more than 80 years, Social Security has provided for the elderly as part of our everyday mission.

Sometimes a family member is incapable of representing themselves due to health reasons. Generally, we look for family or friends to serve as representative payees. Social Security’s Representative Payment Program helps our beneficiaries who are incapable of managing their Social Security and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) payments. You can read more about the program at www.socialsecurity.gov/payee. Continue reading

By Blanca Taylor

Social Security Public Affairs Specialist

Senior Couple Walking With Pet Bulldog In Countryside

Retirement doesn’t have the same meaning for everyone. Some people plan to retire and never work again. Some people plan for second careers in occupations that wouldn’t have adequately supported their families, but they do the work for pure enjoyment. Some people, whether by design or desire, choose to work part-time or seasonally to supplement their retirement income.

Retirees (or survivors) who choose to receive Social Security benefits before they reach full retirement age (FRA) and continue to work have an earnings limit. In 2017, the annual earnings limit was $16,920 for those under FRA the entire calendar year. In 2018, it is $17,040. If you earn over the limit, we deduct $1 from your Social Security monthly benefit payment for every $2 you earn above the annual limit.  Continue reading

By Blanca Taylor

Social Security Public Affairs Specialist

Senior woman working in the flower nursery, with copy space

Retirement doesn’t have the same meaning for everyone. Some people plan to retire and never work again. Some people plan for second careers in occupations that wouldn’t have adequately supported their families, but they do the work for pure enjoyment. Some people, whether by design or desire, choose to work part-time or seasonally to supplement their retirement income.

Retirees (or survivors) who choose to receive Social Security benefits before they reach full retirement age (FRA) and continue to work have an earnings limit. In 2017, the annual earnings limit was $16,920 for those under FRA the entire calendar year. In 2018, it is $17,040. If you earn over the limit, we deduct $1 from your Social Security monthly benefit payment for every $2 you earn above the annual limit.  Continue reading

Ocala Electric Utility would like to provide a few simple tips to keep your family safe and prevent injuries from happening this spring.

OCALA, Fla. (May 3, 2018) – Ocala Electric Utility would like to provide a few simple tips to keep your family safe and prevent injuries from happening this spring.

  • Call 8-1-1 at least 48 hours before you begin any project that involves digging. Power lines may be above you or buried in the ground.
  • Do not trim tree branches that are close to, or touching, power lines.
  • Ladders that come into contact with power lines can be fatal. Keep ladders at least 10 feet away from overhead power lines.
  • Unplug all power tools when not in use.
  • Remember, water and electricity do not mix. Avoid standing in water while using any electrical tools or devices.
  • Inspect power cords for fraying and look for broken plugs and cracked or broken housing. If these items are damaged, they should be replaced immediately.

For more information, please contact Ocala Electric Utility at 352-629-2489 or visit www.ocalaelectric.org.

Bread cast on the water comes back to you. The good deed you do today may benefit you or someone you love at the least expected time. If you never see the deed again at least you will have made the world a better place – And, after all, isn’t that what life is all about?

(NAPSI)—You may have been hearing a lot about the workings of your government and its official documents lately—but often they’re much easier to see than most people realize.

That’s because the Federal Depository Library Program of the U.S. Government Publishing Office partners with 1,150 nationwide federal depository libraries to provide the public with free access to U.S. government documents and informational resources, both current and historic.

There are federal depository libraries throughout the United States and its territories offering all sorts of U.S. government resources. Information is available on such subjects as science, history, health, careers, the military, statistics, travel, citizenship, environment, education, genealogy, and small business management, among others. Continue reading

(NAPSI)—For a growing number of American women, knowing their numbers may just save their life.

The Risk

The problem is heart disease. According to the American Heart Association, it kills one woman about every 80 seconds.

The Awareness Paradox

While a new national poll, conducted by Morning Consult for CVS Health, found that women are aware of the risks of heart disease, most don’t know their numbers for factors that could increase their own risk, such as cholesterol, blood sugar, Body Mass Index (BMI) and waist circumference.

The survey also found that more than one in three women have heart-related conditions such as high cholesterol, hypertension (high blood pressure), diabetes, and history of stroke or a heart defect. Continue reading

by Chip LaMarca

(NAPSI)—Florida has now sustained 117 direct hits by hurricanes in recorded history, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. This is almost twice as many major storms as the runner-up state of Texas.

In fact, in Florida’s annual hurricane season, which runs from June through November, residents can anticipate tropical storm and hurricane warnings for all or parts of the state.

From the effects of Hurricane Andrew in 1992, to more recent Hurricanes Maria and Irma, we’ve been here before—and, sadly, know all too well the aftermath that comes with them.

Floridians typically expect the storms to hit somewhere along the Sunshine State’s 1,350-mile shoreline, but how prepared are their homes, offices and other buildings to withstand the potential damage? Not very, it seems. Continue reading

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