Health, Home & Family

1 2 3 18

(NAPSI)—Hurricane season officially runs through November, and while no one can predict what lies ahead, there are things you can do to prepare. Here, T-Mobile offers eight ways to stay connected.

1.Make a disaster kit: Include things such as batteries, snacks, water, a first aid kit, a flashlight and device chargers.

2.Update your family, friends and emergency services contact numbers. Make sure they’re saved and backed up in your devices AND written down someplace accessible.

3.Subscribe to official text alerts and connect with official social networks to learn about new developments before, during and after a disaster.

4.Keep your mobile devices fully charged. Have charging cables handy and consider picking up a car or portable charging device.

5.Protect your technology with waterproof re-sealable plastic bags.

6.Download emergency-assistance apps from the Red Cross and FEMA.

7.Make sure your phone supports Wireless Emergency Alerts and that you have enabled notifications on your device. Visit t-mobile.com/wea for details on how to set up alerts on T-Mobile and Sprint devices.

8.Set up Wi-Fi Calling on your phone if you have a phone that supports it. For Apple phones, go to Settings > Phone > Wi-Fi Calling; for Android phones, go to Settings > More Connection Settings > Wi-Fi Calling.  Continue reading

(NAPSI)—As the summer months wind down, many will continue to flock outdoors and enjoy outdoor activities like hiking, camping, and fishing. What you may not realize is that despite the weather cooling off, ticks are still very prevalent outdoors.

It is important to check for ticks after spending time in the grass or garden, as ticks can transmit a bacterial infection known as Lyme disease.

The Disease

A bull’s-eye rash is one of the hallmarks of Lyme disease, but other symptoms can be non-specific and even overlap with symptoms of COVID-19. These include body aches, fever, breathlessness, eye pain, diarrhea, chest tightness, headache, fatigue or joint pain.

According to the Global Lyme Alliance, there are approximately 427,000 new cases of Lyme disease in the United States every year. However, Lyme disease is often missed—or misdiagnosed—due to unreliable testing. In fact, only 30% of people with early Lyme infections have a positive test result with existing tests because the disease is difficult to detect in its earliest stages, even though this is when it is easiest to treat.

If you suspect you have Lyme disease or have been recently diagnosed, you can be part of the solution to improve detection of the disease in others. Continue reading

(NAPSI)—As scientists are learning more about COVID-19 and how it affects the body, they are also looking for ways to support the innate immune response to infection. While more research is needed, preclinical studies lay a foundation of science to inform future human studies.

A recently published preclinical study focused on levels of a coenzyme called nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) in cells and animal tissue infected with coronavirus, specifically SARS-CoV-2 and lung tissue from a COVID-19 cadaver. The results revealed that NAD+ may play a key role in cellular defense mechanisms.

The researchers observed how SARS-CoV-2 impacted cellular NAD+ levels and how the virus triggered the infected cells to seek out a cellular nutrient called nicotinamide riboside (NR) in an attempt to replenish the NAD+ levels that had dropped due to infection.

In a separate set of experiments, the researchers provided NR to coronavirus infected mouse cells and showed that viral replication was significantly reduced compared to a control. Continue reading

(NAPSI)—If you or someone you know is a soldier, Army veteran, Army family member or other proud military supporter, you can become a permanent part of history at the National Museum of the United States Army.

An historic project led by the Army Historical Foundation and the U.S. Army, the Museum is going up at Fort Belvoir, Va., just south of Washington, D.C.

“We are proud to build a national museum that will tell the history of the Army—and our nation—through the eyes of American soldiers,” said Foundation President U.S. Army Retired Lt. Gen. Roger Schultz. “The timeline for opening the Museum was delayed because of the COVID-19 pandemic, but we promise it will be worth the wait.”

To be included in the Museum’s story, soldiers and Army veterans can submit their stories of service in the Registry of the American Soldier, which will be one of the largest collections of American Soldier profiles ever assembled. Stories can also be submitted on a veteran’s behalf, at no cost. The Foundation currently features the Registry on its website and the collection will be made available on kiosks in the Museum. Stories can be submitted at www.armyhistory.org/the-registries/.

Members of the Army community can also be a permanent part of the Museum by ordering a customized commemorative brick to be laid on the grounds of the Museum. More than 8,000 bricks have already been installed, honoring soldiers from all 50 states. Among the bricks are those for such well-known Army veterans as Senator Bob Dole and General Eric Shinseki. Individuals and organizations can order bricks at www.armyhistory.org/bricks.

To stay up to date on the project, including announcements about opening day, visit www.armyhistory.org.

(NAPSI)—With day-to-day activities affected by the coronavirus, many people greatly reduced their spending. While saving money is great, a solid financial plan is even better. Here are hints on how:

  1. Make a budget, but focus on the things that you can control. You can’t change your mortgage or rent payment overnight, but you can eat more meals at home.
  2. Clear the clutter, but keep the cash. You can use sites such as Declutter, Facebook Marketplace and Offer Up to profit from the things you no longer need.
  3. Simplify your subscriptions. Today there are subscriptions for everything from entertainment to plants. It’s easy to lose track of how much money you’re really spending. Make a list and do away with subscriptions you don’t fully use.
  4. Plan major purchases. If you’ll need a new dryer, roof or car, figure out how much it will cost so that you can start saving.
  5. Buy used or refurbished electronics. You can find great smartphones, laptops and other electronics in good condition on such sites as Gazelle, Swappa or eBay. Another tip for saving money is to use Upsie for the most affordable warranties for your electronics, appliances and more. Upsie also offers warranties that include accident protection for used devices.

 

Learn More

For further facts and tips, visit upsie.com.

OCALA, Fla.—The Florida Department of Health in Marion County wants Micanopy area residents to be aware that a bat in their area has tested positive for rabies. People who live or work in the area should maintain a heightened awareness that rabies is active in the area.

Residents and visitors are advised to take the following precautions:

–        Avoid all contact with wildlife, particularly raccoons, bats, foxes, skunks, otters, bobcats and coyotes. Never adopt wild animals or bring them into your home.

Never handle unfamiliar animals (wild or domestic), even if they appear friendly.

–        Do not feed or unintentionally attract wild animals with open garbage cans or trash.

–        Keep rabies vaccinations up to date for all pets.

–        Keep pets under direct supervision so they do not come into contact with wild animals.

–        Prevent bats from entering living quarters or occupied spaces in homes, churches, schools, and other similar areas where they might encounter people and pets. Continue reading

(NAPSI)—For many in the American countryside, signals from space have been most welcome for some time. That’s because, in many places, that’s the best way to get Internet service: via satellite.

Then and Now

While early systems may have been only a little better than dial-up, enormous improvements in high-capacity satellites mean they can deliver faster speeds and more data at a more affordable price.

How It Works

Satellite Internet doesn’t rely on terrestrial connections. That’s why it can keep people connected every day and even during disasters when other systems may be down. Instead, the Internet signal is delivered to a connection, which then sends the signal via radio waves up to the satellite over 20,000 miles in the sky. The signal comes back down to your home or office and is captured by a dish-shaped antenna, outside your home, which is connected to the Wi-Fi modem. Continue reading

(NewsUSA)  – Sponsored News -Whether you are in a hotel room, at your desk, in an RV, or by a campfire, it can be difficult to get a good cup of coffee away from home. With the holiday travel season in full swing, travelers are wondering how best to enjoy their morning java while on the go.

Most away-from-home coffee options have major drawbacks. Hotel room coffee makers are convenient and cheap, but the coffee they brew means a major compromise on taste. Local cafes often offer good coffee, but the cost of all those to-go cups can really add up.

Existing travel coffee presses offer a way to brew while on the go, but they typically brew slowly and therefore brew a bitter and very acidic cup.

Travelers benefit from being able to brew delicious coffee quickly and easily wherever they are. Luckily there is a perfect way to do just that.

The AeroPress Go travel coffee press brews up to three cups of delicious hot or cold brew coffee that is richer, smoother, and lower in acidity than coffee brewed by other travel presses. Simply add ground coffee and water, stir briskly, press, and enjoy a cup of hot or cold brew coffee in just a minute or two. Continue reading

The Florida Department of Health in Marion County is involved in several key aspects of COVID-19 response. Primarily, the department is focused on:

Testing

Protecting the elderly and vulnerable

Preparing for medical surge

Educating the public on ways to prevent the spread of the virus

DOH-Marion tests for COVID-19 throughout the week, primarily on-site at the department’s Ocala office. DOH-Marion staff also perform case investigations when someone tests positive for the virus. During the investigations, staff identify and speak with contacts of people who tested positive (contact tracing) so that those individuals can watch for symptoms and get tested as needed. This also ensures that both contacts and people who test positive can take extra precautions to prevent the possible spread of the illness further.

For the latest information on COVID-19 in Florida, visit https://floridahealthcovid19.gov/.

You can be tested for COVID-19 at various places within Marion County: Continue reading

1 2 3 18
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
News Feed with Feedly

Feedly allows you organize all publications, blogs, and information you want to follow to keep up with. Click thumbnail for instructions.

Read Papers on Mobile Device
Subscribe to mailing list

* indicates required



Newsletter and/or digital publication