Health, Home & Family

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Cracker Jack and Lane Loury getting used to each other. Lane is 18 months and is getting his second lesson from his mother Lindsay. Photo taken by Debbie Sykes, grandmother.

The NHLBI develops materials for patients and health professionals on many health topics, such as asthma, heart disease, and sickle cell anemia.

About our Materials

Publications include booklets, fact sheets, reports, DVDs and other formats. Materials are available to view online and some are available as printed copies. Information from the NHLBI is based on the latest scientific findings.

Resources for Health Consumers

These materials can help you or a loved one stay informed on the best practices to prevent, treat, and manage care. Many of our publications for patients are available in Spanish. Continue reading

(NAPSI)—Americans are living longer these days. The number of older adults is expected to reach 73 million by 2030.

With 30 percent of Americans serving in a caregiving role, it is important to remember that caring for a loved one can be both rewarding and difficult. Often, caregivers don’t know where to turn for advice and assistance. That’s where the Eldercare Locator—a program of the U.S. Administration on Aging and administered by the National Association of Area Agencies on Aging (n4a)—Comes in. By connecting older adults and their caregivers to local resources and support, the Eldercare Locator makes life a bit easier all around. The Eldercare Locator connects older adults and their caregivers to local services and supports across the spectrum of need, including in-home and community-based services, transportation and healthy aging.

What It Offers Continue reading

(NAPSI)—High blood pressure is often silent—showing no signs or symptoms—but it’s not invisible. Survivors are speaking out to show the real impact of high blood pressure, and a new campaign from the Ad Council, American Heart Association and American Medical Association provides resources to help you and your doctor create a treatment plan that works for you.

Survivors William, Jill, Francisco, Allyson and others show you what high blood pressure looks like while telling their stories at LowerYourHBP.org to encourage you to get your blood pressure under control before it’s too late.

Understanding High Blood Pressure Continue reading

By Blanca Taylor

Social Security Public Affairs Specialist 

In 2018, more than a million people will be diagnosed with cancer around the world. This alarming statistic affects people and families everywhere. On June 3, 2018, we observe National Cancer Survivors Day in the United States. In support of this day, Social Security encourages getting checkups to provide early detection, raise awareness through education, and recognize the survivors who have gone through this battle or are still living with the disease.

Social Security supports people who are fighting cancer. We offer support to patients dealing with this disease through our disability program. People with certain cancers may be eligible for a Compassionate Allowance. Compassionate Allowances are cases where individuals have medical conditions so severe they obviously meet Social Security’s disability standards, allowing us to process the cases quickly with minimal medical information. Continue reading

Social Security Helps You Care for Seniors

By Blanca Taylor

Social Security Public Affairs Specialist

World Elder Abuse Awareness Day is June 15. This is an opportunity for everyone, all over the world, to voice their opposition to abuses inflicted on some of the most vulnerable members of our society. For more than 80 years, Social Security has provided for the elderly as part of our everyday mission.

Sometimes a family member is incapable of representing themselves due to health reasons. Generally, we look for family or friends to serve as representative payees. Social Security’s Representative Payment Program helps our beneficiaries who are incapable of managing their Social Security and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) payments. You can read more about the program at www.socialsecurity.gov/payee. Continue reading

By Blanca Taylor

Social Security Public Affairs Specialist

Senior Couple Walking With Pet Bulldog In Countryside

Retirement doesn’t have the same meaning for everyone. Some people plan to retire and never work again. Some people plan for second careers in occupations that wouldn’t have adequately supported their families, but they do the work for pure enjoyment. Some people, whether by design or desire, choose to work part-time or seasonally to supplement their retirement income.

Retirees (or survivors) who choose to receive Social Security benefits before they reach full retirement age (FRA) and continue to work have an earnings limit. In 2017, the annual earnings limit was $16,920 for those under FRA the entire calendar year. In 2018, it is $17,040. If you earn over the limit, we deduct $1 from your Social Security monthly benefit payment for every $2 you earn above the annual limit.  Continue reading

By Blanca Taylor

Social Security Public Affairs Specialist

Senior woman working in the flower nursery, with copy space

Retirement doesn’t have the same meaning for everyone. Some people plan to retire and never work again. Some people plan for second careers in occupations that wouldn’t have adequately supported their families, but they do the work for pure enjoyment. Some people, whether by design or desire, choose to work part-time or seasonally to supplement their retirement income.

Retirees (or survivors) who choose to receive Social Security benefits before they reach full retirement age (FRA) and continue to work have an earnings limit. In 2017, the annual earnings limit was $16,920 for those under FRA the entire calendar year. In 2018, it is $17,040. If you earn over the limit, we deduct $1 from your Social Security monthly benefit payment for every $2 you earn above the annual limit.  Continue reading

Ocala Electric Utility would like to provide a few simple tips to keep your family safe and prevent injuries from happening this spring.

OCALA, Fla. (May 3, 2018) – Ocala Electric Utility would like to provide a few simple tips to keep your family safe and prevent injuries from happening this spring.

  • Call 8-1-1 at least 48 hours before you begin any project that involves digging. Power lines may be above you or buried in the ground.
  • Do not trim tree branches that are close to, or touching, power lines.
  • Ladders that come into contact with power lines can be fatal. Keep ladders at least 10 feet away from overhead power lines.
  • Unplug all power tools when not in use.
  • Remember, water and electricity do not mix. Avoid standing in water while using any electrical tools or devices.
  • Inspect power cords for fraying and look for broken plugs and cracked or broken housing. If these items are damaged, they should be replaced immediately.

For more information, please contact Ocala Electric Utility at 352-629-2489 or visit www.ocalaelectric.org.

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