Chief Chris McKinstry

  • A four-way stop is any intersection with a stop sign in each direction, a flashing red light in each direction, or an inoperable traffic light.  Traffic lights that are not working should be treated as a four-way stop sign.
  • Four-way stops are usually (but not always) labeled as such, having a rectangular sign below the octagonal shape which reads something to the effect of, “4-Way Stop,” “Four-Way Stop,” or “All-Way Stop.”
  • Each driver arriving at a four-way stop must first come to a stop, then one driver proceeds at a time.
  • If turning, as you approach a four-way stop, use your turn signal about one hundred feet prior to reaching the stop sign. The four-way stop is one of the most crucial places for using your turn signal compared to almost any other driving situation.
  • Four-way stops always operate in a clockwise direction. So, the car furthest to the right always has the right of way, and then cars take their turns in a clockwise direction.
  • If multiple cars approach a four-way stop at about the same time, the driver who comes to a complete stop first proceeds first.
  • If two or more cars arrive at a four-way stop simultaneously, the driver furthest to the right always proceeds first, and each next driver in the clockwise direction follows.
  • If four cars arrive at a four-way stop simultaneously, drivers going straight should proceed first. If all four are turning right, they may all proceed simultaneously. These aside, there is no distinguishable way to see who should go first, so the intersection is at a standstill until one driver gets up the nerve and begins to inch forward, alerting the other drivers of his or her intentions, and proceeds through the intersection (thus starting the clockwise rotation from that driver).
  • If two cars opposite each other are proceeding straight, both turning right, or one proceeding straight with the other turning right, they may go at the same time. The turn then goes to the adjacent cars at the stop, who may follow the same rule if applicable.

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By Chief McKinstry

Next time you are in a car driving through a residential neighborhood, try this experiment: glance at your speedometer when you’re in the middle of a block.  You will probably find it is pretty easy to reach or top 25 mph.

To someone on foot or in a golf cart, navigating narrow streets and unprotected intersections, it feels like you’re driving too fast.  And they’re probably not wrong.  As you cruise up to 25 mph (on streets outside a school zone), try to imagine that a golf cart swerves into your lane, or a ball rolls right in front of you with a kid chasing it.  Or that someone with an armful of groceries opened a car door without looking, or that a pedestrian in dark clothes stepped into a poorly lit intersection.  Would you be able to stop in time?  Maybe, maybe not. It would depend on how soon you saw whatever you were about to hit.

Then drop your speed to 20 mph. With that small change, it becomes much easier to halt the momentum of 3,000 pounds of metal. Continue reading

Now that many of our seasonal residents and guests are back with us, a quick refresher message about golf carts cannot hurt.  This is especially true in light of the fact that serious consequences, including death, are a very real possibility for not following the law.

Just look around our local neighborhoods and you’ll see the boxy, open-air-vehicles morphing into mini cars that are as common as the full size vehicles zipping around.

Some people are even putting a new spin on the rides, customizing them like hot rods, airplanes, and fire engines to cruise on and off the golf course.  But it is important to remember that this fun mode of transportation has legal and safety limitations.

Laws relating to golf cart operation are sometimes confusing especially when dealing with driver license requirements.  The following information is being provided to assist with the understanding of the requirements and responsibilities of operating a golf cart on a public road or street.  While the following is not a completely comprehensive legal examination, it does provide a snapshot of important highlights contained in the law. Continue reading

Internet and Email Scams

By Chief McKinstry  – Lady Lake PD

As the Chief of Police for the Town of Lady Lake I am often asked, “What can I do to stop folks from becoming a victim of a scam?”   I can tell you the most important thing we all can do is pass the following information along to our friends, family and co-workers so they are aware of these common scams and prevent them from becoming a potential target.

Phishing

Top of Form

The most widespread internet and email scam today is the modern day “sting” con game. “Phishing” is where digital thieves lure you into divulging your password info through convincing emails and web pages. These phishing emails and web pages resemble legitimate credit authorities like Citibank, eBay, or PayPal. They frighten or entice you into visiting a phony web page and entering your ID and password. Continue reading

As the Chief of Police for the Town of Lady Lake I am often asked, “What can I do to stop folks from becoming a victim of a scam?”   I can tell you the most important thing we all can do is pass the following information along to our friends, family and co-workers so they are aware of these common scams and prevent them from becoming a potential target.

Phishing

The most widespread internet and email scam today is the modern day “sting” con game. “Phishing” is where digital thieves lure you into divulging your password info through convincing emails and web pages. These phishing emails and web pages resemble legitimate credit authorities like Citibank, eBay, or PayPal. They frighten or entice you into visiting a phony web page and entering your ID and password. Commonly, the guise is an urgent need to “confirm your identity”. They will even offer you a story of how your account has been attacked by hackers to lure you into entering your confidential information. Continue reading

As the holiday season approaches, many Lady Lake residents will be gathering with family and friends to celebrate. Whether you are traveling out of town or hosting festivities at home, the Lady Lake Police Department wants you to be safe. Here is a security checklist to help protect your home and family.

Before you leave town it is important to make sure your home appears occupied. Place timers on your lights and set them to turn on and off at different times. Lock your garage door and disconnect the automatic opener. Most importantly, tell a trusted neighbor that you are going to be away and ask them to dial 911 immediately if they see anyone on your property.

Here are some additional home security tips to keep in mind: Continue reading

School’s Open – Drive Carefully

No matter where in Florida you may live, keeping our children and students safe is a community responsibility. There are many guidelines put in place to ensure that our students arrive to and from school safely every single day – designated crosswalks, Community Service Aides, seat belt laws, and so on. But one law that is absolutely crucial – and yet often gets ignored – is ALWAYS stopping behind a school bus.

The State of Florida has enacted laws that require every single driver to stop when a school bus has its “Stop” sign extended and its red lights flashing. But sometimes impatient drivers may think to themselves, “There are no children crossing the street, and I’ll drive very slowly so I can stop if I see one. I don’t have time to sit and wait for this bus!” Drivers like these should think again: the penalties for passing stopped school bus could literally stop you in your tracks for quite a long time. Continue reading

Every person who willfully obtains personal identifying information, e.g., name, address, date of birth, Social Security Number (SSN), mother’s maiden name, etc., and uses that information for any unlawful purpose is guilty of a crime. Identity theft is the fastest growing crime in the United States. Every year about 15 million people become victims. Everyone is vulnerable. Skilled identity thieves use a variety of methods to steal your personal information. These include the following:

Dumpster diving:  They rummage through trash looking for bills and other paper with your personal information on it.

Skimming: They steal credit- or debit-card numbers with a special storage device when processing your card.

Phishing, spear phishing, smishing, vishing, and whaling:  They send realistic-looking e-mail that asks recipients to go to a bogus website and provide personal information, use text messages instead of e-mails, and send fake e-mails to high-ranking executives to trick them into clicking on a link that takes them to a website that downloads software that secretly records keystrokes and sends data to a remote computer over the Internet. Continue reading

As our thoughts turn to relaxation and family fun this summer, keep in mind that thieves and burglars don’t take vacations from criminal activity. Stay vigilant about protecting yourself, your home, your belongings and your identity. Don’t let crime or weather ruin your summer fun.

The best advice is to stay alert. Be aware of what’s going on in your neighborhood. Never hesitate to report suspicious activity to law enforcement. If you notice activity at your neighbors’ house when you know they are away on vacation, call 911 immediately. Your tip might be the one that helps the Lady Lake Police Department catch a burglar. If you notice someone lurking around cars in a parking lot, phone in that tip. Teaming up and keeping the lines of communication open between law enforcement and observant residents is the best defense against criminals. Continue reading

“Those who have not learned from history are doomed to repeat it.”  That is especially true with hurricanes.   Even though forecasting methods and tools are improving year after year, people are still at great risk if they are not prepared.

Experience has taught us that the best thing to do before a hurricane is prepare, so you can be confident during a storm that you’ve done everything you can to keep your family safe. As your Chief of Police, I want you to know that during a hurricane, you can depend on the resilience and resourcefulness of the men and women of the Lady Lake Police Department.

As a local law enforcement agency, we work year-round with our local, county, state and federal partners to improve our response, cooperation and communication during hurricanes. Just as we at the police department plan for unexpected weather emergencies, there is plenty you can do to make yourselves, your families and your homes ready for hurricane season. Don’t wait for a storm to threaten. Continue reading

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